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Movement and Flow: Simulating Complexity of Fluids and Strands in the Virtual World

A Multi-Scale Model for Coupling Strands with Shear-Dependent Liquid | Image Source: http://www.cs.columbia.edu/cg/creamystrand/

· Technical Papers

31 October 2019, Brisbane, Queensland — Simulating the physics behind the movement of liquids and how fluids—thick or thin—interact with other objects is a key problem in visual effects. Bringing to life such scenarios as a brush stirring and spreading oil paint onto a canvas or spaghetti tossed in pasta sauce involves sophisticated computational modeling. These types of scenarios, in particular, are difficult to simulate due to the complex rheology of liquid—how its shape changes and transforms with movement—and the intricate interactions between the liquid and the strands.

A team of computer scientists are addressing this problem in computer graphics with a novel, multi-scale framework that realistically and precisely imitates the complex dynamics of strands interacting with so-called shear-dependent liquids, such as mud, oil paint, melted chocolate, or pasta sauce. The researchers, from Columbia Engineering and the University of Waterloo, are set to present their work at ACM SIGGRAPH Asia, held Nov. 17 to 20 in Brisbane, Australia. SIGGRAPH Asia, now in its 12th year, attracts the most respected technical and creative people from around the world in computer graphics, animation, interactivity, gaming, and emerging technologies.

A Multi-Scale Model for Coupling Strands with Shear-Dependent Liquid

Unique to this work is the precise modeling of the complexity of fluid-strand dynamics. Imagine for instance a bowl of spaghetti, and attempting to animate how much sauce clings onto various strands of the pasta as it is being twirled and lifted out of a bowl with a fork. To simulate such a scenario, the researchers’ method accounts for the fluid-strand interaction occurring across many scales—at both the small scale for thin strands and their surface flows and the large scale for bulk fluid.

“The multiscale nature of this problem poses a key challenge,” says Yun (Raymond) Fei, lead author of the work who recently completed his PhD in computer science at Columbia. “It demands our simulation model to handle both a large chunk of fluids moving around and the small, detailed motions by strands and their surface flows.”

Fei’s collaborators include coauthors Christopher Batty of the University of Waterloo-Canada and from Columbia Engineering, Eitan Grinspun and Changxi Zheng.

Expanding on previous work in animating wet hair, this new computational framework accounts for the volume change of the liquid as it passes through strands and the momentum exchange between the strands and the liquid. Their framework also accounts for cohesion between strands and how the fluid motions affect the strand motion and vice versa. The framework consists of three components: a model that simulates the fluid flowing on the surface of strands, a model that simulates the motion of individual hair strands and their collisions (e.g. the bowl of spaghetti and sauce), and a model that simulates bulk fluid moving as a continuum, such as water flowing from a faucet.

“Our algorithm brings together multiple physical models at both fine and large scales, and enables the simulation to capture highly complex, rich and multi-physics phenomena in fluid-strand interactions,” says Zheng, associate professor of computer science at Columbia.

The researchers demonstrated their method on a wide range of materials and a number of examples, including challenging scenarios involving splashing, shaking, and agitating the liquid which causes the strands to stick together and become entangled. For example, to illustrate the cohesive and frictional behavior of wet hairs, the method was used to realistically simulate a hair-covered ball lifting from a mud puddle and shaking. When the motion stops, the hairs stick and tangle as expected.

“There is a wealth of fluid-strand examples in the physical world that we were inspired to mimic in the virtual world,” says Grinspun, who conducted the research while an associate professor at Columbia Engineering; Grinspun is now professor of computer science at the University of Toronto. “What we’ve been able to achieve and to lend to artists and users is a precise, multi-scale technique to account for the layers of sophisticated mathematics and physics behind this complex dynamic.”

The team’s method can be immediately applied to the creation of special effects in the film industry. Previous work from these collaborators have been used by leading visual effects houses such as WETA Digital, and in feature films including Moana and Jungle Book. In future work, the researchers envision this method can be applied to predict how objects move and form in the production of cosmetics or in robotics design.

For the paper and video, visit the team’s project page.

SIGGRAPH Asia 2019 takes place at the Brisbane Exhibition and Convention Centre 17-20 November 2019. For more information, please visit https://sa2019.siggraph.org.

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Embed video: https://youtu.be/4aCPqyouQ3g

Notes to Editors

1.Keep tabs of updates, download images and more at the SIGGRAPH Asia virtual newsroom

2.Media may apply for media accreditation to SIGGRAPH Asia at bit.ly/sa19accreditation

3. Learn more about SIGGRAPH Asia's Technical Papers.

About SIGGRAPH Asia 2019

The 12th ACM SIGGRAPH Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Asia (SIGGRAPH Asia 2019) will be held in Brisbane, Australia at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre (BCEC) from 17 – 20 November 2019. The annual event held in Asia attracts the most respected technical and creative people from all over the world who are excited by computer graphics research, science, art, animation, gaming, interactivity, education and emerging technologies.

The four-day conference will include a diverse range of juried programs, such as the Art Gallery / Art Papers, Computer Animation Festival, Courses, Doctoral Consortium, Emerging Technologies, Posters, Technical Briefs, Technical Papers and XR (Extended Reality). Curated programs include Business & Innovation Symposium, Demoscene and Real-Time Live! A three-day exhibition held from 18 – 20 November 2019 will offer a business platform for industry players to market their innovative products and services to the computer graphics and interactive techniques professionals and enthusiasts from Asia and beyond. For more information, please visit http://sa2019.siggraph.org. Find us on: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube with the official event hashtag, #SIGGRAPHAsia and #SIGGRAPHAsia2019.

About ACM SIGGRAPH

The ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques is an interdisciplinary community interested in research, technology, and applications in computer graphics and interactive techniques. Members include researchers, developers, and users from the technical, academic, business, and art communities. ACM SIGGRAPH enriches the computer graphics and interactive techniques community year-round through its conferences, global network of professional and student chapters, publications, and educational activities. For more information, please visit www.siggraph.org.

About Koelnmesse

Koelnmesse Pte Ltd is one of the world's largest trade fair companies. Its more than 80 trade fairs and exhibitions have the broadest international scope in the industry, as 60 percent of the exhibitors and 40 percent of the visitors come from outside Germany. The Koelnmesse events include leading global trade fairs for 25 sectors, such as Imm Cologne, Anuga, IDS, INTERMOT, Interzum Cologne, Photokina, Gamescom, and the International Hardware Fair Cologne. Koelnmesse is ACM SIGGRAPH’s event organizer for the last 11 editions of SIGGRAPH Asia. For more information, please visit www.koelnmesse.com.sg.

Media Contacts

Illka Gobius, PINPOINT PR

illka@pinpointpr.sg | Mobile +65 97698370

Jamie Huang, Koelnmesse Pte Ltd

jamie.huang@siggraph.org| Mobile +65 92329738

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